KYOCERA Global Donates Solar Power Generating Systems to Schools in Africa

We’re pleased to hear that Kyocera Global has recently donated solar power technology to schools in Tanzania and Uganda. An ongoing project since 2009, Kyocera Global has been providing solar power generating systems to schools in Africa which now totals 28 schools in five years. Kyocera has donated to schools that have no access to electricity with the project able to provide electricity for much needed storage batteries, lamps, TV sets, radios and general lighting. With additional installations at seven schools in the last fiscal year, donations have already been made to a total of 28 schools, with seven more to follow by March 2014.

Tanzania Solar Donation

Kyocera believes in the great possibilities of the young generation in Africa and hopes that its donations in Tanzania and Uganda will help further the education of students who carry the future of the countries on their shoulders. To directly convey these hopes, donation ceremonies were held in which a company representative interacted with the teachers and students.

Kyocera started research into solar energy in 1975 when then-president Dr Kazuo Inamori first recognized the long-term potential for solar technology to contribute to global energy demand. Shortly after, in the early 1980’s, the company began providing solar power systems to regions without electricity in Pakistan, China and Nepal. Kyocera remains strongly committed to its business philosophy of utilizing solar energy for the protection of the environment and the improvement of people’s lives.

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For more information about Kyocera products and services visit our website or fill in an online enquiry form.

KYOCERA to Supply 405 Kilowatts of Renewable Solar Energy to Remote Villages of Fiji

Kyocera Solar, Inc. recently announced that its solar energy systems will power ­over 2000 homes in the FijiIslands. Working in partnership with Fiji’s Department of Energy, and the Fifth Pacific Islands Leaders Meeting project (Palm 5), the solar projects aim to bring renewable energy to remote villages across Fiji.

The remote Fijian villages do not receive power from a traditional electric grid, with the installation of these solar systems; rural villages are able to thrive.  Each system will utilize Kyocera’s modules and the sun’s energy to provide basic lighting and other low-power needs on the islands.

On a recent visit to Fiji George Phani, National Sales and Operation Manager Kyocera Solar Australia was able to see first hand the difference the installation of the solar modules will have on the local people:

“Solar energy makes so much sense for island nations that often lack an electricity grid infrastructure but have an abundance of sunshine year-round,” says George “With our Kyocera modules; many Fijians have been given light and other electricity into the night – maybe for the first time. We hope this program can                                                               serve as a template for other islands to follow.”

Kyocera has partnered with Powerlite Generators (Fiji) Limited to install 3,000 solar modules throughout Fiji. Each system includes at least one 135-watt Kyocera module, a regulator, maintenance-free batteries, and both indoor and outdoor lighting.

 

About Kyocera Solar:

Kyocera is one of the world’s largest vertically integrated producers and suppliers of solar photovoltaic modules and systems, with a 37-year history of innovation in solar technology. Recognized as a global leader and industry pioneer in solar power solutions, Kyocera is in a unique position to integrate its decades of experience into product development and support for both residential and industrial clients across the globe. Kyocera serves thousands of customers in both developed and developing regions, with more than 3 gigawatts of solar collection equipment installed since 1975. The company has set repeated world records in multicrystal silicon cell efficiency and most recently gained the distinction of producing the world’s first modules to pass the Long-Term Sequential Test for reliability performed by TUV Rheinland Japan Ltd.

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